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Reoccurring Natural Disasters, Quality of Government, and Severe Child Deprivation: A Comparative Analysis of 67 Developing Countries

In this paper we explore to what degree exposure to different types of reoccurring natural disasters is related to children’s exposure to sever deprivation across sixty-seven middle- and low-income countries (LMICs). First, we test whether there does indeed exist an adverse effect of recurrent... Full description

1st Person: Daoud, Adel
Additional Persons: Halleröd, Björn; Guha Sapir, Deberati
Event: MACHEquity Annual Meeting, Bangalore
2014-09-10/2014-09-12, Bangalore
Type of Publication: Presentation
Published: 2014
Keywords: Child poverty > disasters > quality of government > developing countries > multi-level analysis > comparative
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033 2 |a 20140910  |a 20140912  |p Bangalore 
100 1 |a Daoud, Adel  |u Projekte von Gastwissenschaftlern und Postdoc-Stipendiaten, MPI for the Study of Societies, Max Planck Society; Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden  |0 (eterms:CONE)/persons/resource/persons182778  |4 aut 
245 1 0 |a Reoccurring Natural Disasters, Quality of Government, and Severe Child Deprivation: A Comparative Analysis of 67 Developing Countries 
260 |c 2014 
518 |a MACHEquity Annual Meeting, Bangalore  |d 2014-09-10/2014-09-12  |p Bangalore 
520 3 |a In this paper we explore to what degree exposure to different types of reoccurring natural disasters is related to children’s exposure to sever deprivation across sixty-seven middle- and low-income countries (LMICs). First, we test whether there does indeed exist an adverse effect of recurrent disasters on child deprivation. Thereafter, we test whether the adverse effect of disasters is moderated by quality of government, i.e., by the governmental capacity to act proactively, prepare infrastructure, healthcare systems, etc., as well as to react properly once disaster is a fact. The analysis combines country-level data on disasters, compiled from the EM-DAT database, with micro-data on child deprivation, based on harmonized DHS and MICS data (n = 1941734). We conclude that recurrent disasters have very little to do with child deprivation in LMICs. What we can confirm is that that children, regardless of natural disasters, are less deprived in well-governed countries with good quality of government (QoG). Hence, children’s misfortune is not primarily caused by nature, but is instead most certainly manmade. 
653 0 0 |a Child poverty  |a disasters  |a quality of government  |a developing countries  |a multi-level analysis  |a comparative 
700 1 |a Halleröd, Björn  |u Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Sweden  |4 aut 
700 1 |a Guha Sapir, Deberati  |u Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED), Brussels, Belgium  |4 aut 
887 |a ctx_1240555  |2 mpg.pure.context.id 
996 |a Vortrag 
997 |a talk-at-event 

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