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How Small Countries Negotiate Change: Twenty-Five Years of Policy Adjustment in Austria, the Netherlands, and Belgium

Although Austria, the Netherlands, and Belgium are so seemingly alike in their tightly coupled, consociational, and corporatist democratic structures and in the “Bismarckian” origin of their welfare states, they have had radically different experiences since the 1970s. While the Netherlands,... Full description

1st Person: Hemerijck, Anton
Additional Persons: Unger, Brigitte; Visser, Jelle
Source: in: Welfare and Work in the Open Economy Volume II: Diverse Responses to Common Challenges (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), p. 175-263
Type of Publication: Article
Published: 2000
Keywords: Austria > Belgium > Bismarckian welfare state > consociationalism > corporatism > Dutch disease > language communities > Netherlands > social partners > veto positions
Online: Full text via publisher
Full text via Oxford Scholarship Online
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100 1 |a Hemerijck, Anton  |u Projekte von Gastwissenschaftlern und Postdoc-Stipendiaten, MPI for the Study of Societies, Max Planck Society; Leiden University, The Netherlands  |0 (eterms:CONE)/persons/resource/persons41200  |4 aut 
245 1 0 |a How Small Countries Negotiate Change: Twenty-Five Years of Policy Adjustment in Austria, the Netherlands, and Belgium  |h [Online] 
260 |c 2000 
300 |a 89 p. 
520 3 |a Although Austria, the Netherlands, and Belgium are so seemingly alike in their tightly coupled, consociational, and corporatist democratic structures and in the “Bismarckian” origin of their welfare states, they have had radically different experiences since the 1970s. While the Netherlands, which appeared in the 1970s and early 1980s to be afflicted with a terminal ‘Dutch disease’, has seemingly been cured, Belgium, with a similar initial profile, has been malingering and Austria has managed to avoid the crises from which the others are recovering. Since all three countries have internationally exposed and hence vulnerable economies as well as policymaking structures with plural veto positions, the success or failure of adjustment policies did depend on the ability of actors to adopt action orientations that emphasize common, rather than separate, interests. The Austrian social partners succeeded in maintaining this ‘encompassing’ perspective throughout the period under study; the Dutch had to relearn it after dismal failures; and in Belgium, the increasing salience of linguistic cleavages added to the difficulty of achieving, and acting on, convergent perceptions and interest definitions. 
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653 0 0 |a Austria  |a Belgium  |a Bismarckian welfare state  |a consociationalism  |a corporatism  |a Dutch disease  |a language communities  |a Netherlands  |a social partners  |a veto positions 
700 1 |a Unger, Brigitte  |u University of Economics and Business Administration, Vienna, Austria  |4 aut 
700 1 |a Visser, Jelle  |u Centre fro research of European Societies and Industrial Relations (CESAR), University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands  |0 (eterms:CONE)/persons/resource/persons41323  |4 aut 
773 0 8 |i in:  |t Welfare and Work in the Open Economy Volume II: Diverse Responses to Common Challenges  |d Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000  |g p. 175-263  |z 0-19-924092-2  |z 0-19-924091-4  |7 nnac 
800 1 |a Scharpf, Fritz W.  |e [Editor]  |t Welfare and Work in the Open Economy Volume II: Diverse Responses to Common Challenges  |u Problemlösungsfähigkeit der Mehrebenenpolitik in Europa, MPI for the Study of Societies, Max Planck Society  |0 (eterms:CONE)/persons/resource/persons41288  |4 edt 
800 1 |a Schmidt, Vivien A.  |e [Editor]  |t Welfare and Work in the Open Economy Volume II: Diverse Responses to Common Challenges  |u Problemlösungsfähigkeit der Mehrebenenpolitik in Europa, MPI for the Study of Societies, Max Planck Society; Department of Political Science, University of Massachusetts, Boston  |0 (eterms:CONE)/persons/resource/persons41292  |4 edt 
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952 |g 89  |h 175-263  |j 2000 
995 |a multiple_import  |a eDoc Migration Full 2011-11-25 13:29 
996 |a Beitrag in Sammelwerk 
997 |a contribution to collected-edition 

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