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Coaching by Conceptual Focus: Problems, Solutions, and Tutored Images

The nature of art suggests that visual imagery contains an internal logic. Many artists consider creating art to be a problem-solving activity even though the vocabulary and procedures of problem solving come from science. When children employ nonverbal aesthetic properties or concepts to solve... Full description

1st Person: Rush, Jean C.
Source: in Studies in art education Vol. 31, No. 1 (1989), p. 46-57
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Type of Publication: Article
Language: English
Published: 1989
Keywords: research-article
Online: Volltext
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Summary: The nature of art suggests that visual imagery contains an internal logic. Many artists consider creating art to be a problem-solving activity even though the vocabulary and procedures of problem solving come from science. When children employ nonverbal aesthetic properties or concepts to solve artistic problems posed by teachers, the results are called tutored images. When a teacher designates problems to be solved, conceptual focus or consistency throughout all lesson components is essential to learning. The reliance of discipline-based art education (DBAE) on problem solving in art production suggests a need to extend DBAE's Content-Curriculum-Context theoretical base to include a fourth dimension called Coaching, the use of conceptually focused instruction to encourage students' artistic expression.
Item Description: Copyright: Copyright 1989 National Art Education Association
Physical Description: Online-Ressource
ISSN: 0039-3541

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