Katalog GES



Free to Trade: Democracies, Autocracies, and International Trade

Relatively little research has focused on whether countries' political institutions affect their international trade relations. We address this issue by analyzing the relationship between regime type and trade policy. In a formal model of commercial policy, we establish that the ratification... Full description

1st Person: Mansfield, Edward D.
Additional Persons: Milner, Helen V. verfasserin; Rosendorff, B. Peter verfasserin
Source: in American political science review Vol. 94, No. 2 (2000), p. 305-321
More Articles
Type of Publication: Article
Language: English
Published: 2000
Keywords: research-article
Online: Volltext
Volltext
  Search for full text
Summary: Relatively little research has focused on whether countries' political institutions affect their international trade relations. We address this issue by analyzing the relationship between regime type and trade policy. In a formal model of commercial policy, we establish that the ratification responsibility of the legislature in democratic states leads pairs of democracies to set trade barriers at a lower level than mixed country-pairs (composed of an autocracy and a democracy). We test this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of regime type on trade during the period from 1960 to 1990. The results of this analysis accord with our argument: Democratic pairs have had much more open trade relations than mixed pairs.
Item Description: Copyright: Copyright 2000 American Political Science Association
Physical Description: Online-Ressource
ISSN: 1537-5943

Similar Items

Cannot find similar records

Library Services

Search Options

Quick links

Orientation